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Posts Tagged ‘.net framework’

PowerShell: Finding Friday the 13th

Posted by Trevor Sullivan on 2012/01/13


Update (2012-01-13): Justin Dearing (aka @zippy1981) informed me that it would be more efficient to look at the 13th of each month, and test if it was a Friday. In theory at least, he’s absolutely correct; I wrote the function the first way I thought of it, and I always welcome suggested improvements.

This morning I noticed that it was Friday the 13th. No, I didn’t realize it by looking at the Windows 7 system clock. I realized it because I had the worst morning waking up for the past month. I started wondering when the next Friday the 13th would be, and how often they occurred. To satisfy my curiosity, I immediately thought to write a PowerShell advanced function to find them! This was also partially inspired by Jeff Hicks’ posting 13 PowerShell scriptblocks for Friday the 13th.

There are two parameters to this function:

  • StartDate (default to "today")
  • EndDate (default to "today" +1460 days, which is roughly 4 years in the future)

You can call this function using neither parameter, one of them, or both of them. Both parameters are [System.DateTime] structs, and PowerShell will automatically try to parse any string value passed into them. Here is an example:

Find-Friday13th -StartDate 2000-01-01 -EndDate 2005-01-01

And here is the function!

<#
    .Synopsis
    This function finds Friday the 13ths.

    .Parameter StartDate
    The date you want to begin searching for Friday the 13ths.
    .Parameter EndDate
    The end date you want to search for Friday the 13ths.

    .Outputs
    [System.DateTime] objects that represent Friday the 13ths.

    .Notes
    Written by Trevor Sullivan (pcgeek86@gmail.com) on Friday, January 13, 2012.
#>
function Find-Friday13th {
    [CmdletBinding()]
    param (
        [DateTime] $EndDate = ((Get-Date) + ([TimeSpan]::FromDays(1460)))
        , [DateTime] $StartDate = (Get-Date)
    )

    # Inform user that the $EndDate parameter value must be greater than the $StartDate parameter value
    if ($EndDate -lt $StartDate) {
        Write-Error -Message 'The EndDate must be greater than the StartDate!';
        return;
    }

    # Get the next Friday after $StartDate
    while ($StartDate.DayOfWeek -ne 'Friday') {
        Write-Host "Finding next Friday";
        $StartDate = $StartDate.Add([TimeSpan]::FromDays(1));
    }

    # While $StartDate is less than $EndDate, add 7 days
    while ($StartDate -lt $EndDate) {
        # If the Day # is 13, then write the [DateTime] object to the pipeline
        if ($StartDate.Day -eq 13) {
            Write-Output -InputObject $StartDate;
        }
        # Add 7 days to $StartDate (next Friday after current)
        $StartDate = $StartDate.Add([TimeSpan]::FromDays(7));
    }
}

# Call the function
Find-Friday13th -EndDate 2017-12-31

 

Here’s what the function’s output looks like. The objects returned to the pipeline are all [System.DateTime] objects, which are automatically being ToString()’d.

image

Posted in .NET, powershell, scripting | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »